Saturday, June 6, 2020

MORE PROJECTS AND ZOOM


As we begin the fourth month of dealing with the Coronavirus pandemic most of us are slowly moving into a more open environment. Who knows what the new normal will actually turn out to be, but for now it's refreshing to hear that many of us have been coping with isolation by making some beautiful book art and sharing it on various platforms. One can see wonderful examples on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest. Zoom meetings and other online classes are also becoming more popular since we haven't been able to meet in person. We hope you will continue to share your projects with us as we all strive to move forward and remain healthy.

NORBAG will hold its first Zoom meeting on Saturday June 13. This meeting will not have a workshop but rather a chance for our members to get comfortable with Zoom and meet and greet other members. It will be hosted by Celeste Chalasani and she will do a PowerPoint presentation of photos our members send to her. These photos could include books they've made for the exchanges (yet to be exchanged) as well as any projects they've been working on. In other words, your basic "show & tell". Please refer to page 1 of the June Newsletter for information and tips for using Zoom. 

WHAT:  NORBAG Zoom Meeting
WHEN:  June 13, 2020 at 12:00 pm Pacific Time (US and Canada)
RSVP:   YES, to Dolores by June 10 to receive information on how to join the Zoom meeting, along with the password. For the PowerPoint presentation, please send photos in JPG format to Celeste by June 10. Contact information for both Dolores and Celeste is in the newsletter.



Here are some examples of how our members have been using their "free" time.
  

This photo is a collection of books Bonnie Julien made in Helen Hiebert’s Flexible Book Structures 2 online class. The six week course included the following projects: Momigami & stained Tyvek, Expandable File Folder, Book Light, Pocket Book, Envelope Photo Album, and Scroll-a-Notebook. For more information about Helen’s classes here is a link: https://helenhiebertstudio.com/shop/product-category/class/
Michele Kamprath has been busy making some lovely books using monoprints. She watched Sally Hirst's Monotype Mayhem classes and came up with some wonderful prints.

Secret Belgian binding

This Secret Belgian binding book was a birthday gift to Michele's son.

Monoprints galore

This book features many of the monoprints.


Margaret Beech has sent another one of her fun book structures. She called this structure a crazy fold, but if you have a copy of the NORBAG compendium, vol.3 pg.20 you’ll find it listed as the "Whirligig" book.

This book was made several years ago by Dolores Guffey for a book exchange.


The "whirligig" part way opened

Here is what Margaret shared. "This time I am sharing my Crazy Fold with you. This is very easy BUT requires maximum concentration when measuring up. It's fun to make and it's up to you how you decorate the pages. In the illustration I simply used papers cut from old books but you could use decorated papers, music paper, write some quotations or verses of a poem or even old map pages. The fun really lies in the unraveling and the way the book folds up again. You will need to keep it under control so might need to make an envelope to hold your fold."

Margaret also said that you could cut from a roll of wallpaper lining paper (or even some leftover wallpaper and your crazy fold will already be decorated). It's best to cut a longer length than needed once you start to measure. If you need to get rid of the natural curl of the wallpaper or lining, simply place the roll into a sink full of warm water. It doesn't need to remain long and you will see that the paper soon flattens. Just drip the water off then lay flat on a towel until the paper is really dry and you will be all ready to begin. Margaret said that this is not a good way to flatten brown paper from the roll however.



Margaret sent this piece "to give you encouragement 

if you are whiling away your days with creative stuff.
I find it's a wonderful way to spend time, and the things
we make give pleasure to the people we share them with."




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